Dangers of Mixing Adderall with Alcohol

Dangers of Mixing Adderall with Alcohol

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Dangers of Mixing Adderall with Alcohol

What is Adderall

Adderall is a prescription medication that is prescribed to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as well as sleep disorders such as narcolepsy. For those with ADHD, Adderall can calm the system and allow the person to focus and behave normally, much like Ritalin. These medications compensate for deficits, not increase performance as many believe.

 Adderall has a much different effect on those that take the medication without ADHD. Though some who take Adderall without a prescription believe they are more focused, it is not true. It is only because the medication increases the dopamine in the reward center of the brain that these feelings exist. This in turn makes people feel more alert and attentive. While increasing the calming effect of the brain. Additionally, some without ADHD may feel effects, but what they are experiencing these effects is actually a placebo effect. Basically this means that you feel better and more focused simply because you believe you will.

Aside from the fact that Adderall may not be effective for even those with a prescription, self medicating can be dangerous. When medications such as Adderall are mixed with other drugs, legal or not, even bigger problems may arise.

Mixing Adderall with Alcohol

Dangers of Mixing Adderall with AlcoholAs Adderall has become a commonly prescribed medication, in that relaying ADHD symptoms to a doctor are simple, so has its abuse. Unfortunately, many people are mixing this medication, prescribed or not, with alcohol creating negative effects. The first issue is with Adderall alone. As it is a schedule 2 drug, it is high on the scale for addiction and abuse. This stimulant, when used in conjunction with alcohol creates a fight between the stimulant. Adderall, and the depressant, alcohol, within the body. This is where the problem arises.

Adderall can dull the senses making it seem you are not as drunk as you actually are. This can easily lead to alcohol poisoning as you drink more to reach that ‘drunk’ feeling. Not feeling as drunk can also lead a person to partake in risky behaviors. Such as driving, unprotected sex, and otherwise poor decision making. This may also include an increase in behavioral aggression, leading to fights. Mixing Adderall and Alcohol can also lead to heart problems. All stimulant medications carry some risk of heart problems. However, this is higher when abusing the drug or pairing it with something such as alcohol. When combined your body temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure may rise and your heart can beat irregularly.

What to Do

If you or a loved one are prescribed Adderall, the best option is to take it appropriately and to avoid alcohol as the combination may actually make ADHD worse. However, if you are abusing Adderall and/or Mixing it with alcohol then you should be aware of the effects it can have on your body. If you find yourself or a loved one with an addiction problem then seek help right away. Those with ADHD tend to have problems with the control center of the brain, making impulsivity, attention, and critical thinking problematic. This may mean it is harder to fight addiction overall. When you or your loved one are ready, try a center such as DARA for help with medication management and lifestyle changes that can help you get life back on the right path. Never be afraid to ask for help, you are worth it.

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Anne -

Anne Lazarakis joined the DARA Rehab team from Sydney, Australia. She writes about addiction and mental health on a global, local and community level. She also relays personal accounts of substance abuse and recovery through the stories of our clients, their families and our own team members.

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